Follow our #TestFlights

Get updates when we are flying during the following weeks.

Core Team

Job applications flood in, but no-one really appreciates the high achievement level and the demands that are made on team members.

For each of them, trying to build a flying machine for which no benchmark exists, means being confronted constantly with uncertainties and question marks. 

Their creativity is matched only by the enthusiasm of their commitment. 

Founders

Two men, both pioneers and innovators, both pilots, are driving force behind Solar Impulse. Bertrand Piccard, psychiatrist and aeronaut, who made the first non-stop round-the-world balloon flight, is the initiator and chairman. André Borschberg, an engineer and graduate in management science, a fighter pilot and a professional airplane and helicopter pilot, is the CEO. The former’s avant-gardist vision and the latter’s entrepreneurial and managerial experience are an ideal combination.

Configuration & structure

Mechanical engineers, aeronautical engineers, physicists, specialists in structures and aerodynamics, in design and calculating tools, leading-edge specialists in composite materials, pilots with a passion for renewable energy. From the drawing board to the complicated calculations necessary. All have joined forces to finalise the solar airplane's structure and turn a dream into reality.

Energy & Propulsion

The electrical engineers at Solar Impulse have demonstrated their capacity to push all pre-conceived notions to the limit by defying the challenge of solving the delicate balance between maximum efficiency, lightest weight and extreme reliability of the airplane’s photovoltaic cells. To ensure that the energy created is effectively managed, transformed, stockpiled and regulated, the team developed high-performance motors and batteries, all of which are monitored by a central computer permitting energy use optimization during flights.

Production / Workshop

In this state-of-the-art project there is no room for experimenting. Each concept, each piece of the solar plane has to pass several tests before being certified as "suitable for flight". A small highly-qualified team watches over all these crucial tests. In the different workshops in Dübendorf aerodrome's hangar no. 3, specialists in composite materials and mechanical engineering are assembling the plane and fitting all its component parts.

Project Support

Defining the plane's configuration, its size, the number of engines, its form – this is all the job of engineers with degrees in aeronautics and mechanical engineering, mathematicians and specialists in the algorithms used in modelling and simulation. They are all multi-disciplinary, with know-how in leading-edge construction techniques, aerodynamics, thermodynamics, project and systems management and computer simulation.

Flight Test

As the HB-SIA, the second plane HB-SIB is going to have to be put through a whole series of trials before setting out on its round the world tour, the project's ultimate highlight. In this test phase, pilots will be joining up with the engineers, taking charge of the ground tests and then the test flights. The engineers' knowledge of performance and flight dynamics will be paired with the talent and skills of the pilots.

Flight Mission

The mission team brings together experts responsible for preparing the flights and missions. The flight director, air traffic controllers, mechanical engineers and IT specialists all play a crucial role in the adventure, providing the pilot with data crucial for following his flight plan. Right from the first virtual flight, they have been studying possible scenarios, gathering data and building models, in preparation for day J.

Take Off Team

Solar Impulse unites a whole family of international partners sharing the project's pioneering spirit, underwriting its feasibility and committing themselves to promote renewable energy. The partnership team is our interface to them. The public relations team is responsible for liaising with the media all over the world to bring over to the public the challenges involved. The finance department and the secretariat are also indispensable for helping this adventure to take off.

Ground Crew

The Ground Crew consists of a group of people passionate about the project, of all ages and horizons. They are available at all times during mission flights to carry out test flights, preparation and execution of the mission. Their role is to ensure proper functioning of the pilot’s equipment, handling of the aircraft on the ground, operational efficiency and safety during take-off and landing as well as performing safety checks after every flight.

Fred Merz | Solar Impulse | Rezo.ch

The pace is quickening for Solar Impulse. The epic round-the-world flight begins next March, so this summer of 2014 means, for the engineers, test flying Solar Impulse 2, and for the Mission and Logistics Teams, detailed preparations for the round-the-world trip. Meanwhile ... in Lausanne…

… the MARCOM team – short for marketing & communications – are also busy making preparations. The nine people in MARCOM are working energetically to make the Solar Impulse adventure known to the world at large, through marketing, communication, branding, publishing, web-based activities, merchandising, and guided ...

Read more

… the MARCOM team – short for marketing & communications – are also busy making preparations. The nine people in MARCOM are working energetically to make the Solar Impulse adventure known to the world at large, through marketing, communication, branding, publishing, web-based activities, merchandising, and guided tours. They take care of relations with the public, press and partners.

This week, two of us from the MARCOM team are going to introduce ourselves: Vincent and Bruno, responsible for keeping the website interesting, and for social networks. You most likely know us without realizing it. Every week we go looking for new content that might interest you, and are often out in the field to let you see behind the scenes of Solar Impulse. Have you ever watched the web series "homemade" #Insider on Youtube? Are you already connected to our Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and Vine accounts? We urge you to take a look at these activities, and let us have your ideas, suggestions and requests!

 

“ Six months flying around the world in a solar airplane, sitting beside the pilots and their team ...just as if you were there..”

 

During the 6 months when our pilots and some support team members are on their way around the world, we aim to enable you to experience every moment as if you were there, thanks to our platforms:

- The round-the-world website of Solar Impulse will allow you to experience the epic journey minute by minute, as if sitting in with the pilots and Mission Control Center (MCC). You will have access to videos and photos and all information collected on social networks. You can contact the team, assist the pilot, and above all help to spread news of the Solar Impulse adventure and the message it sends among your friends!

- The round-the-world mobile app: Solar Impulse will also be accessible on your smartphone, allowing you to keep track of the missions, and even talk to the pilot and crew.

- Our social networks: if you’re not yet following us, but would like to be kept informed about our activities, please don’t hesitate to join the community on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Youtube, Instagram.


Whilst we’re working on these platforms, we’d like to involve you in the process of reflection. You’ll no doubt want to follow the adventure. What kind of information would you like to have on the round-the-world trip and about each flight-leg? What activities, discussions and perhaps concrete impact would you like to have? Please feel free to leave your comments below. They’ll be very helpful for us.

PATRICK EBERLE

Electrical Engineer ETH

I’m supporting the certification process.

Biography:

  • After education in electrical ...
Read more

PATRICK EBERLE

Electrical Engineer ETH

I’m supporting the certification process.

Biography:

  • After education in electrical engineering at the ETH Zurich I have been working as a software developer and project manager for twenty years.
  • Coming from the machine manufacturing and automotive industries, developing aircrafts is a new experience for me.
  • I’m divorced and have a daughter.

Positive headlines

As Solar Impulse makes its way to the nation’s capital, the first to last destination of the 2013 Across America mission, it’s a good moment to look back and review the project’s overall media coverage. The press has been extremely welcoming of Solar Impulse and over 7’000 press clippings have been recorded, ...

Read more

As Solar Impulse makes its way to the nation’s capital, the first to last destination of the 2013 Across America mission, it’s a good moment to look back and review the project’s overall media coverage. The press has been extremely welcoming of Solar Impulse and over 7’000 press clippings have been recorded, including hits from the Associated Press, Agence France Presse and Reuters (from February 28th until June 4th 2013).

Such a high level of activity was achieved thanks to the incredible effort of Solar Impulse’s Media Relations Manager, Alexandra Gindroz, and Media Relations Coordinator, Alenka Zibetto. They are the driving force behind the media and the ones that ensure journalists are not only at the right place at the right time, but they also feed the press vital information and coordinate interviews with the pilots André and Bertrand in flight and on the ground.

“The project is like a magnet, it attracts the media” revealed Alexandra. “We’re therefore more reactive than proactive” and even though the project has been around for 10 years, the excitement around it hasn’t faltered. “The project’s calendar has been able to avoid an interest slump,” continued Alexandra, “we started by presenting the airplane’s design in 2007, followed by the unveiling, the first test flights and, in 2010, the world’s first night flight purely on solar energy. In 2011, there were the European flights to Brussels and Paris and, in 2012, we achieved the first solar-powered intercontinental flight connecting Europe to Africa.”

“The project carries a positive message and, although the media generally prefer intrigues and problems, Solar Impulse proves that this project can still inspire and make people dream,” added Alenka. What drives these two young women is in fact the positive aura that surrounds the project. They both agree that it’s the first time in their careers that they’ve had to manage media requests instead of working hard to promote something.

In the United States, the relationship with the media has been very positive and enjoyable with many of them so motivated as to attend flight take-offs at the crack of dawn. Thanks to the support of Weber Shandwick and SJR, Alexandra and Alenka have had invaluable support for the US market, a market that they weren’t familiar with before the 2013 Across America mission.

Despite their efforts to ensure the message is properly reproduced, misinterpretations are inevitable. There have been publications where Solar Impulse has already flown around the world (scheduled for 2015), where Bertrand’s last name was Borschberg and vice versa for André and… where Solar Impulse was mistaken for a U.F.O! During the landing in Phoenix a couple of weeks ago, the police received over 1’000 calls from worried residents. The police rushed to a helicopter and flew to the airport. In touch with the control tower, they inquired about the strange flying object, “A solar plane flying at night?” asked the policemen. Yes indeed, a solar airplane landing at night.

Doesn’t’ that just inspire you? A solar plane flying at night isn’t a dream. And what a perfect subject to lighten up our spirits: squeezed between news about the war in Syria and North Korea’s nuclear program we can also rest assured that Aliens haven’t yet invaded Planet Earth.

Where’s the rest of the Solar Impulse team?

If you’ve been watching Solar Impulse TV during today’s flight, you maybe got a feel for the size of the team. Ground Crew and Logistics teams are in the US, ensuring that flights are carried out smoothly from takeoff to landing. The Marketing & Communications team and the Mission Control Center folks (who include ...

Read more

If you’ve been watching Solar Impulse TV during today’s flight, you maybe got a feel for the size of the team. Ground Crew and Logistics teams are in the US, ensuring that flights are carried out smoothly from takeoff to landing. The Marketing & Communications team and the Mission Control Center folks (who include meteorologists, Air Traffic Controllers and the Flight Director) are all in Payerne (Switzerland) guiding the pilot in the air with all sorts of programs and satellite connection devices. And there’s the multimedia team, split between two continents, Old and New, keeping us entertained and connected as the sleek silhouette of HB-SIA glides through the North American skies. But where are the engineers?

We’ve hidden them in a quiet place, where the skies are always grey and common distractions are scarce… in the suburbs of Zurich. We have to make sure they don’t escape, right? Jokes aside, the men and women that together have contributed to build HB-SIA are all extremely busy making a new airplane: Solar Impulse’s second generation solar-powered aircraft, HB-SIB. Indeed, if you thought the adventure was going to end with a graceful landing at New York’s JFK airport this summer, you were mistaken. The adventure will continue with the flight around the world scheduled for 2015.

The design phase of HB-SIB’s construction is complete and the Solar Impulse engineers are now busy testing parts in preparation for the assembly, scheduled for the end of 2013. Just a couple of weeks ago there was the Iron Bird – designed to test the electric wiring and overall electronics in a mock cockpit. Everything was setup as if it were the “real thing” with the hundreds of wires pulled through the full structure of the cockpit. Each part is initially tested separately, but in a complex electric system with different machines and a number of variables in play it is important to verify how everything interacts. The tests were successful. The four motors were running at 300 rpm at the same time as the other systems, such as the driver, the batteries and the balancers. A few other tests are still scheduled and, once everything is given a green light, it will be transposed as is to HB-SIB’s cockpit.

If you want to more about the Making Of HB-SIB, click here

Discussing to perfection

Just like the eternal to and fro between civil engineers and architects to find the best balance between design and a physically viable structure, a constant discourse goes on between the Design and Structural Analysis teams at Solar Impulse. The difference is that they’re all engineers, so no need to fix wacky structures ...

Read more

Just like the eternal to and fro between civil engineers and architects to find the best balance between design and a physically viable structure, a constant discourse goes on between the Design and Structural Analysis teams at Solar Impulse. The difference is that they’re all engineers, so no need to fix wacky structures that can only exist in cartoons.

Everything that’s designed has a purpose but every part needs to fit in the greater scheme of things while also abiding to the strict lightweight guidelines. Led by Geri Piller, the Structural Analysis team consists of 4 engineers. The Design team has the concept, but it’s up to Geri’s team to decide which and how many materials to use for a given part in relation to the load that it must carry.

Geri once gave me a 101 Structural Analysis course (I would have certainly done better at reading a Chinese newspaper though), but I did manage to retain something: every material reacts differently to loads (for example, steel reacts to stress differently than carbon) and this is crucial when building a part.

For reasons of weight, the majority of HB-SIB’s structure is made out of carbon, a very peculiar material. Carbon is extremely resistant in the direction of its fibers, but extremely frail in the other. The Structural Analysis team has to decide in which direction the fibers must be placed, how thick each layer has to be and how many plies are needed. This results in complex manipulations with a specialized software (FEA finite element analysis) where the structural engineers manually input the characteristics they want and subsequently observe how the part reacts to the expected loads applied to it.

It’s not a linear process (it takes two to tango). It’s a constant back and forth between structural and design engineers, an ongoing discussion to reach perfection because, once the design and structure make the perfect match, the part is finally sent to the producer; a joint effort that gives birth to a new part. Because of the unique nature of this aircraft, every part is literally handmade. Consequently, some information can be lost in translation when transforming the software design into a manufactured part. That’s why every part needs to be tested thereafter; a crucial process Geri and his team actively engage in. Stay tuned for information about the Testing team coming soon on our blog!

In the photos: from left to right: Björn Müller, Stefan Pfammatter, Geri Piller and Dominik Dusek (adjacent), Geri Piller (bottom), FEA (top).

Follow the series here: "THE MAKING OF A SOLAR AIRPLANE"


Read more news