Follow our #SummerFlights

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Fred Merz | Solar Impulse | Rezo.ch

The pace is quickening for Solar Impulse. The epic round-the-world flight begins next March, so this summer of 2014 means, for the engineers, test flying Solar Impulse 2, and for the Mission and Logistics Teams, detailed preparations for the round-the-world trip. Meanwhile ... in Lausanne…

… the MARCOM team – short for marketing & communications – are also busy making preparations. The nine people in MARCOM are working energetically to make the Solar Impulse adventure known to the world at large, through marketing, communication, branding, publishing, web-based activities, merchandising, and guided ...

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… the MARCOM team – short for marketing & communications – are also busy making preparations. The nine people in MARCOM are working energetically to make the Solar Impulse adventure known to the world at large, through marketing, communication, branding, publishing, web-based activities, merchandising, and guided tours. They take care of relations with the public, press and partners.

This week, two of us from the MARCOM team are going to introduce ourselves: Vincent and Bruno, responsible for keeping the website interesting, and for social networks. You most likely know us without realizing it. Every week we go looking for new content that might interest you, and are often out in the field to let you see behind the scenes of Solar Impulse. Have you ever watched the web series "homemade" #Insider on Youtube? Are you already connected to our Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and Vine accounts? We urge you to take a look at these activities, and let us have your ideas, suggestions and requests!

 

“ Six months flying around the world in a solar airplane, sitting beside the pilots and their team ...just as if you were there..”

 

During the 6 months when our pilots and some support team members are on their way around the world, we aim to enable you to experience every moment as if you were there, thanks to our platforms:

- The round-the-world website of Solar Impulse will allow you to experience the epic journey minute by minute, as if sitting in with the pilots and Mission Control Center (MCC). You will have access to videos and photos and all information collected on social networks. You can contact the team, assist the pilot, and above all help to spread news of the Solar Impulse adventure and the message it sends among your friends!

- The round-the-world mobile app: Solar Impulse will also be accessible on your smartphone, allowing you to keep track of the missions, and even talk to the pilot and crew.

- Our social networks: if you’re not yet following us, but would like to be kept informed about our activities, please don’t hesitate to join the community on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Youtube, Instagram.


Whilst we’re working on these platforms, we’d like to involve you in the process of reflection. You’ll no doubt want to follow the adventure. What kind of information would you like to have on the round-the-world trip and about each flight-leg? What activities, discussions and perhaps concrete impact would you like to have? Please feel free to leave your comments below. They’ll be very helpful for us.

PATRICK EBERLE

Electrical Engineer ETH

I’m supporting the certification process.

Biography:

  • After education in electrical ...
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PATRICK EBERLE

Electrical Engineer ETH

I’m supporting the certification process.

Biography:

  • After education in electrical engineering at the ETH Zurich I have been working as a software developer and project manager for twenty years.
  • Coming from the machine manufacturing and automotive industries, developing aircrafts is a new experience for me.
  • I’m divorced and have a daughter.

The listener

Solar Impulse is a very unique project and it’s also why its relationship with partners is more than just a marketing endeavor: it finances technological innovation and renewable energies; it finances solutions for the future. For this reason Solar Impulse calls these relationships partnerships.

A partnership ...

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Solar Impulse is a very unique project and it’s also why its relationship with partners is more than just a marketing endeavor: it finances technological innovation and renewable energies; it finances solutions for the future. For this reason Solar Impulse calls these relationships partnerships.

A partnership is a two-way street that requires a continuous and ongoing exchange. The person responsible for this at Solar Impulse is Marc de Borst, sound engineer turned public relations specialist. Communicating is his thing, be that through music or words, so he immediately found himself in his element when he took on the role of Partner Relations & Development Coordinator. He’s the main point of contact, the link. In close cooperation with Solar Impulse’s Marketing Managing Director, Gregory Blatt, Marc participates in the partner-search process, offers support to define new contracts and acts as the guardian of partners’ rights after the deal is sealed. He makes sure that partners have all the material and information necessary to actively communicate their partnership across various platforms. Working hand in hand with partners, Marc ensures that their contribution and role in the project is visible to the outside world. He acts like an ear when something needs to be changed. In fact, that’s Marc’s most important yet most subtle role, the ear, the listener.

Every partner is unique, like Solar Impulse, and is treated like an individual. There are partners that contribute technology to the project, others provide engineers or project management skills; others embed their specialists or provide insurance coverage for the airplane. There are also different partnership levels, different needs, and different expectations. During the Across America, for example, some partners wanted to organize events with schools, others for employees or clients and others a conference with the pilots. Marc had to coordinate their needs and seek a feasible and satisfactory option in line with their partnership agreement.

What truly drives Marc is the human contact and achieving the highest degree of satisfaction. In perfect harmony, Marc and our partners share the same vision and commitment to making this a reality. 

Positive headlines

As Solar Impulse makes its way to the nation’s capital, the first to last destination of the 2013 Across America mission, it’s a good moment to look back and review the project’s overall media coverage. The press has been extremely welcoming of Solar Impulse and over 7’000 press clippings have been recorded, ...

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As Solar Impulse makes its way to the nation’s capital, the first to last destination of the 2013 Across America mission, it’s a good moment to look back and review the project’s overall media coverage. The press has been extremely welcoming of Solar Impulse and over 7’000 press clippings have been recorded, including hits from the Associated Press, Agence France Presse and Reuters (from February 28th until June 4th 2013).

Such a high level of activity was achieved thanks to the incredible effort of Solar Impulse’s Media Relations Manager, Alexandra Gindroz, and Media Relations Coordinator, Alenka Zibetto. They are the driving force behind the media and the ones that ensure journalists are not only at the right place at the right time, but they also feed the press vital information and coordinate interviews with the pilots André and Bertrand in flight and on the ground.

“The project is like a magnet, it attracts the media” revealed Alexandra. “We’re therefore more reactive than proactive” and even though the project has been around for 10 years, the excitement around it hasn’t faltered. “The project’s calendar has been able to avoid an interest slump,” continued Alexandra, “we started by presenting the airplane’s design in 2007, followed by the unveiling, the first test flights and, in 2010, the world’s first night flight purely on solar energy. In 2011, there were the European flights to Brussels and Paris and, in 2012, we achieved the first solar-powered intercontinental flight connecting Europe to Africa.”

“The project carries a positive message and, although the media generally prefer intrigues and problems, Solar Impulse proves that this project can still inspire and make people dream,” added Alenka. What drives these two young women is in fact the positive aura that surrounds the project. They both agree that it’s the first time in their careers that they’ve had to manage media requests instead of working hard to promote something.

In the United States, the relationship with the media has been very positive and enjoyable with many of them so motivated as to attend flight take-offs at the crack of dawn. Thanks to the support of Weber Shandwick and SJR, Alexandra and Alenka have had invaluable support for the US market, a market that they weren’t familiar with before the 2013 Across America mission.

Despite their efforts to ensure the message is properly reproduced, misinterpretations are inevitable. There have been publications where Solar Impulse has already flown around the world (scheduled for 2015), where Bertrand’s last name was Borschberg and vice versa for André and… where Solar Impulse was mistaken for a U.F.O! During the landing in Phoenix a couple of weeks ago, the police received over 1’000 calls from worried residents. The police rushed to a helicopter and flew to the airport. In touch with the control tower, they inquired about the strange flying object, “A solar plane flying at night?” asked the policemen. Yes indeed, a solar airplane landing at night.

Doesn’t’ that just inspire you? A solar plane flying at night isn’t a dream. And what a perfect subject to lighten up our spirits: squeezed between news about the war in Syria and North Korea’s nuclear program we can also rest assured that Aliens haven’t yet invaded Planet Earth.

Where’s the rest of the Solar Impulse team?

If you’ve been watching Solar Impulse TV during today’s flight, you maybe got a feel for the size of the team. Ground Crew and Logistics teams are in the US, ensuring that flights are carried out smoothly from takeoff to landing. The Marketing & Communications team and the Mission Control Center folks (who include ...

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If you’ve been watching Solar Impulse TV during today’s flight, you maybe got a feel for the size of the team. Ground Crew and Logistics teams are in the US, ensuring that flights are carried out smoothly from takeoff to landing. The Marketing & Communications team and the Mission Control Center folks (who include meteorologists, Air Traffic Controllers and the Flight Director) are all in Payerne (Switzerland) guiding the pilot in the air with all sorts of programs and satellite connection devices. And there’s the multimedia team, split between two continents, Old and New, keeping us entertained and connected as the sleek silhouette of HB-SIA glides through the North American skies. But where are the engineers?

We’ve hidden them in a quiet place, where the skies are always grey and common distractions are scarce… in the suburbs of Zurich. We have to make sure they don’t escape, right? Jokes aside, the men and women that together have contributed to build HB-SIA are all extremely busy making a new airplane: Solar Impulse’s second generation solar-powered aircraft, HB-SIB. Indeed, if you thought the adventure was going to end with a graceful landing at New York’s JFK airport this summer, you were mistaken. The adventure will continue with the flight around the world scheduled for 2015.

The design phase of HB-SIB’s construction is complete and the Solar Impulse engineers are now busy testing parts in preparation for the assembly, scheduled for the end of 2013. Just a couple of weeks ago there was the Iron Bird – designed to test the electric wiring and overall electronics in a mock cockpit. Everything was setup as if it were the “real thing” with the hundreds of wires pulled through the full structure of the cockpit. Each part is initially tested separately, but in a complex electric system with different machines and a number of variables in play it is important to verify how everything interacts. The tests were successful. The four motors were running at 300 rpm at the same time as the other systems, such as the driver, the batteries and the balancers. A few other tests are still scheduled and, once everything is given a green light, it will be transposed as is to HB-SIB’s cockpit.

If you want to more about the Making Of HB-SIB, click here


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