On March 21, 1999, Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones realized the First Round-The-World non-stop Balloon Flight, with Breitling Orbiter 3.

This flight is still the longest in aviation for both distance and duration. It took off on March 1, 1999 from Château-d’Oex (Swiss Alps) and landed in Egypt after 19 days, 21 hours and 47 minutes, accomplishing a 45633 km journey.

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This flight is still the longest in aviation for both distance and duration. It took off on March 1, 1999 from Château-d’Oex (Swiss Alps) and landed in Egypt after 19 days, 21 hours and 47 minutes, accomplishing a 45633 km journey.

Discover more on Bertrand Piccard's website, or facebook page.

Dubendorf, Switzerland: From December 17 to December 20, 2013, Solar Impulse team is doing a 72 hours non-stop flight simulation. The goal of the experience is to make the pilot as “sustainable” as the aircraft, in preparation for the first round-the-world solar flight in 2015. Bertrand Piccard (Initiator, chairman and pilot) will remain at the controls of the flight simulator, a near-exact reconstruction of HB-SIB’s cockpit during 3 days and 3 nights.

Another important step towards the 2015 First Ever Round the World Solar Flight!

Over the several years Solar Impulse has proved that is its possible to fly with unlimited endurance. But as we know, Solar Impulse is more than a technical challenge. It is also about pushing human limits to new levels. 

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Another important step towards the 2015 First Ever Round the World Solar Flight!

Over the several years Solar Impulse has proved that is its possible to fly with unlimited endurance. But as we know, Solar Impulse is more than a technical challenge. It is also about pushing human limits to new levels. 

The Transatlantic 72 Hour Simulation is about Pilot sustainability. Bertrand will spend 3 days in a simulator in Dübendorf (Switzerland) and the entire team, along with several key Partners — EPFL, Lantal, CHUV, Hirslanden, Altran, Nestle Health Science — will study how Bertrand interacts in the cockpit. 

Bertrand will cross the Atlantic from America. The final destination in Europe will depend on weather conditions. Having gone through this exercise myself in 2011, it is important that as a pilot we learn how to best live in the cockpit. We need to learn how to manage our own energy and to cope with fatigue, to develop our eating habits and understand bodily functions. 

In order to create a real life situation we have the entire team working on this simulation. The Mission team who is leading the flight simulation, is joined by the the logistics, ground and communication teams and different situations and scenarios surrounding emergency response will be tested. 

Join us on this adventure through our website where you have the opportunity to view videos and pictures, follow Google Hangout conferences and watch interviews with an impressive group of specialists.

I just wished Bertrand a safe flight just prior to him taking off from Norfolk (NY) in the USA. An incredibly real life experience as so many times we have said good bye to one another on past mission flights. I am sure Bertrand will have a wonderful time as this is truly an amazing experience in exploring and discovering one self. 


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