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As part of the UN Climate Summit in New York, the Solar Impulse founders were elated to announce Abu Dhabi as the start and finish point for the first Round-the-World solar flight to be attempted in 2015.

Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg were just two of the delegation that included 120 Heads of State and Government, and over 800 leaders in business, finance and civil society responding to Ban Ki-moon's invitation. The spirit of the summit resonated around the world, including a gathering of 300,000 ...

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Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg were just two of the delegation that included 120 Heads of State and Government, and over 800 leaders in business, finance and civil society responding to Ban Ki-moon's invitation. The spirit of the summit resonated around the world, including a gathering of 300,000 supporters in the streets of New York.

The political momentum has gained since the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference in 2009: while previously the delegates only recognized the existence of the problem, the summit in New York saw a more positive and determined commitment to financing low-carbon development and the adoption of clean technologies. Indeed, a fund of $200bn was agreed by a coalition of global leaders.

The only way to motivate people is to demonstrate the existence of solutions, not only to speak about the problem,” said Bertrand Piccard. “It was great to meet so many people acting to change the world,” continued André Borschberg.

The Solar Impulse founders announced Abu Dhabi as the host city, and Masdar as the host partner while standing alongside Didier Burkhalter, President of the Swiss Confederation, His Highness Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed, UAE Minister of Foreign Affairs and Dr. Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber, Chairman of Masdar.

Bertrand and André were pleased to be back in New York just a year after completing their flight across America with Si1, the first generation Solar Impulse airplane. Their record-breaking journey in 2013 visited the cities of San Francisco, Phoenix, Dallas, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Washington and New York. Second generation Si2 will look to make stopovers across the USA as it attempts the first Round-The-World solar flight, commencing in March 2015.

The summit was really a positive time to develop the momentum for meaningful change in developing and adopting clean technologies, of which Solar Impulse is a pioneering example. The first Round-The-World solar flight will be bracketed by the forthcoming summit in Lima, later this year, and the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris at the end of 2015.

Solar Impulse | Revillard | Rezo.ch

With nine successful flights logged, Solar Impulse 2 is about to enter a new phase in the preparations for its round-the-world flight!

This week-end, Markus Scherdel will make the first high-altitude flight, climbing to more than 20,000 feet (6,000 meters). He will remain airborne for between 12 and 13 hours. This is a further important step forward, enabling the aircraft’s behaviour to be evaluated and studied at high altitudes, where the air starts ...

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This week-end, Markus Scherdel will make the first high-altitude flight, climbing to more than 20,000 feet (6,000 meters). He will remain airborne for between 12 and 13 hours. This is a further important step forward, enabling the aircraft’s behaviour to be evaluated and studied at high altitudes, where the air starts becoming less dense. Until now, the airplane has displayed very stable characteristics, and I’m crossing my fingers that this will remain the case up there aloft!

This phase involves important challenges. Having carried out flights lasting two or three hours, we are now going to test a new area of the flight envelope for the first time: higher altitude and higher airspeed, lower air density. With such an enormous wingspan, the risk of flutter (aeroelasticity) is high. So the forthcoming flight does involve certain risks. This tenth flight will also evaluate the insulation of the cockpit, since the external temperature will drop to about

-20°C. Markus will have to fly the airplane despite experiencing more challenging conditions. Our flight testing team will be carefully monitoring the functioning of the solar generators, the oxygen system, and the Pilot Assistance System (a kind of auto-pilot) from the Mission Control Center (MCC).


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